How to Lower Liver Enzymes?

The liver is often called “the ultimate multitasking organ”.

It is unique in so many ways.

For starters, it is the largest internal organ in our body, but in the same time, it is one of the few with limited regenerative power.

The main function of the liver is to produce enzymes that aid in essential functions from removal of toxins to helping with digestion.

However, when your liver is working too much, your enzymes levels are increased [1].

Overused liver is not good, and sometimes just a simple diet change can help you how to lower liver enzymes.

The problem with the liver is that the damage can begin with just very few symptoms and signs [2].

But once the enzymes are elevated, health issues follow through.

With that in mind, here are a couple of ways for how to lower liver enzymes.

How to lower liver enzymes

Stop drinking alcohol

It is very difficult for your liver to process alcohol.

When you drink it too much and too often, your liver suffers damage.

One of the first steps in lowering liver enzymes is to stop drinking alcohol [3].

Or at least reduce it to two-three alcohol-free days per week in the beginning.

During the week, you should not drink more than 8 alcoholic drinks.

Stop using non-prescription drugs

If the drugs were prescribed by your physician, that is OK.

But over the counter drugs you might be using for pain relief, those should go away [4].

Ibuprofen, aspirin, and other OTC drugs can impede liver function.

Non-prescription drugs prevent your liver from working properly, and the symptoms won’t be noticeable until it is too late.

Usually, the symptoms due to non-prescription drugs appear when there is already high amount of damage to the liver.

Reduce exposure to toxins

Toxins are all around us. And the most dangerous of them all are environmental toxins, including sunscreens, perfumes, detergents, disinfectant, paint fumes, chemical cleansers, and even second hand smoking [5].

Start concerning what your body absorbs from the products you use.

Demand more information, and start small by avoiding products with petroleum distillates.

Cut off processed foods

This is one of the simplest, but most challenging change you need to make.

Pre-prepared, boxed foods, and similar processed foods that contain sodium and refined sugar are taxing to your liver.

They contain a ton of chemicals and preservatives that are not considered healthy at all.

Instead, opt for fresh and whole foods.

Up your leafy greens

Leafy green vegetables are the most important ingredients in your how to lower liver enzymes journey.

They are rich in vitamins, minerals, and many other essential nutrients that are important for your liver function [6].

They can also lower the amount of fat deposits in the liver.

Some of the best leafy greens are kale, spinach, mustard greens, beets, and turnips.

Look for foods high in antioxidants

Beets, for example, are very high in flavonoids that support liver function [7].

No, them alone won’t lower your liver enzymes.

But they are a good start.

Some other foods high in antioxidants include avocado, walnuts, pecans, berries, and so on.

Get your optimal fiber per day

A healthy adult needs between 35g and 50g of fiber per day.

This will prevent your body from absorbing cholesterol.

And once you reduce the amount of cholesterol your body needs to process, or more specifically, your liver, the organ will be healthier and your enzyme levels will go down.

Foods high in fiber include beans, oat, wheat, corn, berries, whole grains, leafy greens, nuts, and fruits like apples, prunes, peaches, pears.

The power of cruciferous vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables are known for balancing production of detoxifying liver enzymes.

They also neutralize cancer-causing carcinogens in the body, and bring a ton of vitamins, minerals, and fiber to the table [8].

The list of cruciferous vegetables includes broccoli, watercress, radishes, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, turnips, and wasabi.

Consume more fish

You can either increase your consumption of fatty fish, or take some fish oil supplements.

We prefer the former, as it is a natural way to lower liver enzymes.

Diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids means a lot of salmon, tuna, and sardines [9].

Omega-3 fatty acids help you lower dangerous triglycerides, a type of fat that can be fatal in high doses.

Detox, and then detox more

Your diet is not the only way to detox your body and flush out toxins.

You can also call for some natural herbs like dandelion [10].

Prepare a dandelion tea, or use milk thistle, to aid the detoxifying of your liver.

Consume regularly to prevent liver damage, but also improve your overall health.

Understanding your liver and its functions

The main thing you need to know for how to lower liver enzymes is understand your liver, and what does it do for you [11].

The liver aids in glandular functions and with other organ systems.

The liver protects your body by detoxifying hormones, drugs, or any other molecules not produced in the human body.

The liver also has a function of synthesizing cholesterol and proteins, stores vitamins, stores minerals, and sugar, all while removing bacteria.

What are the conditions that can tax the liver?

Because the liver performs so many functions, it is prone to many diseases.

Some of the wide variety includes:

  • Hepatitis viruses
  • Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis, commonly known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Alcoholic hepatitis
  • Jaundice
  • Cirrhosis or late-stage scarring of the liver
  • Cancer related to previous viral infections
  • Infections that burden the liver like mononucleosis

The next step is understanding and recognizing the symptoms of a liver disease.

If you notice one or more of the symptoms, it is time to make a change.

You need to understand how to lower liver enzymes, so that you can protect your liver from further damage.

Here are some of the symptoms:

  • Swelling in the legs and ankles
  • Yellowish skin
  • Abdominal pain and swelling
  • Dark yellow or reddish urine color
  • Itchy skin
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Pale stools or blood stools
  • Nausea and vomiting

liver enzymes

Sources:

  1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/elevated-liver-enzymes/basics/definition/sym-20050830
  2. https://www.medicinenet.com/liver_blood_tests/article.htm
  3. https://www.journal-of-hepatology.eu/article/S0168-8278(05)80659-2/abstract
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3156474/
  5. http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/21433/InTech-Adverse_effects_of_drugs_and_toxins_on_the_liver.pdf
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4726750/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4661801/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4526841/
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5019889/
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499388/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2984286/

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